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Emma Dabiri
What White People Can Do Next

With a confrontational title, the message of the book is pretty straight-forward and ambitious. The text is a long essay which consists of a set of guidelines that offers white people a way to confront systemic racism that does not fall into historically cliched and ineffectual advice.

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Orientalism: A brief introduction

One of our aims with poco.lit. is to try to demystify some of the core ideas in and around postcolonial studies and the ways in which postcolonial literatures have been read. In this post, we take a look at Orientalism by Edward Said and some of its key contributions to thinking about colonial practices.

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Amitav Ghosh
In an Antique Land

This is a wonderfully strange book, and probably the most obvious reason for its strangeness is the confluence of genres it enacts. Ghosh’s book gives his readers both the findings of many years of research, and the story of his undertaking that research.

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Ta-Nehisi Coates
Between the world and me

Between the world and me is a letter from a father to his son about living in the United States of America in a Black man’s body. There are moments in this book where the beauty of Coates’ prose is quite breath-taking, and the whole is sustained by an intellectual rigour that allows it to shine all the better

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Ciani-Sophia Höder
Wut und Böse

Different communities have reappropriated terms, so surely an emotion can be reclaimed. Anger is not necessarily something evil in itself. Rather, it can be an expression of people’s realization that something is evil – unjust social structures, for example.

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Şeyda Kurt
Radikale Zärtlichkeit – Warum Liebe politisch ist

The starting point for writing her book “Radical Tenderness – Why Love is Political” was a discomfort with common images of love that are shaped by power relations, which empty the word of any real content. This critical view of love evoked Şeyda Kurt’s preference for the term tenderness: implying ways of behaving that couldn’t be further from any form of violence.

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Priya Basil
In the we and now: Becoming a feminist

Basil talks about her own politicization and analyses feminist dilemmas in the context of #MeToo and her co-creation of an issue of a leading fashion magazine with numerous other women who form a feminist circle of allies and actually have nothing to do with the fashion world.

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