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Jasmina Kuhnke
Schwarzes Herz

Schwarzes Herz is the first novel by anti-racism activist Jasmina Kuhnke, and it reads like a diary entry by the protagonist. The first-person perspective, which allows readers to experience the fictional world of the protagonist from her perspective, is a particularly valuable one in the context of racism and domestic violence: it’s the voice of an affected person and readers have to listen.

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Priya Basil
In the we and now: Becoming a feminist

Basil talks about her own politicization and analyses feminist dilemmas in the context of #MeToo and her co-creation of an issue of a leading fashion magazine with numerous other women who form a feminist circle of allies and actually have nothing to do with the fashion world.

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Mohamed Amjahid
Der weisse Fleck

If you’ve read an introduction to antiracist thinking already, Amjahid’s new book provides further insights and possible options for action in order to critically deal with one’s own position – especially as a white person.

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Political Terms and (Un)just Social Structures: An Interview with the Producers of “Erklär mir mal…” (Explain it to me)

As part of our macht.sprache. project, we’re seeking out input from various experts who deal with language, translation or artificial intelligence. With Maja Bogojević and Victoria Jeffries, the producers of the Instagram channel “Erklär mir mal…” (Explain it to me), we discuss the challenges in political work with language.

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Mithu Sanyal
Identitti

Identitti is Mithu Sanyal’s first novel. I was very much looking forward to this book, and I was not at all disappointed: it examines an identity scandal from all sides with nuance and – despite all seriousness – humour.

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Queer Afropolitanism in Germany: SchwarzRund

This essay is the last in a four-part series on Afropolitanism and literature. SchwarzRund’s intervention in the Afropolitan literary market thus stands out not only because of the setting and language of the novel, but also because of its evidently intersectional approach.

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